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Three Easy and Effective Moving Averages To Start Using Today

If you're an active stock trader, then you're likely familiar with technical analysis and the use of various indicators to guide your decision-making. 

One such indicator that has gained popularity in recent years is the Simple Moving Average (SMA). Specifically, the 50, 20, and 200 SMA are often referenced in technical analysis, and for good reason. In this blog post, we'll discuss why these moving averages are important and how they can be used to inform your trades.

First, let's start with the basics. A Simple Moving Average is calculated by taking the average price of a security over a specified period of time. The period can be any length, but the most common periods used in technical analysis are the 50, 20, and 200-day SMAs. The longer the period, the smoother the moving average line will be, and the less sensitive it will be to short-term price fluctuations.

Now, let's dive into why these specific moving averages are important. The 50-day SMA is considered a mid-term moving average and is often used as a gauge of the short-term trend. When the price of a stock is above its 50-day SMA, it's generally considered to be in an uptrend, and when the price is below the 50-day SMA, it's considered to be in a downtrend. Traders will often use the 50-day SMA as a signal to enter or exit a trade, depending on whether the trend is bullish or bearish.

The 20-day SMA is a shorter-term moving average and is often used in conjunction with the 50-day SMA. When the 20-day SMA crosses above the 50-day SMA, it's known as a "golden cross," and is considered to be a bullish signal. Conversely, when the 20-day SMA crosses below the 50-day SMA, it's known as a "death cross," and is considered to be a bearish signal. Traders will often use these crosses as entry or exit signals.

The 200-day SMA is a longer-term moving average and is often used to gauge the overall trend of a security. When the price of a stock is above its 200-day SMA, it's generally considered to be in a long-term uptrend, and when the price is below the 200-day SMA, it's considered to be in a long-term downtrend. Traders will often use the 200-day SMA as a signal to hold onto a position if the trend is bullish or to consider selling if the trend is bearish.

It's important to note that no indicator is foolproof, and traders should always use multiple indicators and perform their own analysis before making a trade. However, the 50, 20, and 200 SMAs are widely used for a reason – they provide valuable information about the short-term, mid-term, and long-term trends of a security. By incorporating these moving averages into your technical analysis, you can make more informed trading decisions and increase your chances of success.

~ To Your Success

Suzan



Trading Risk Disclaimer

All the information shared is provided for educational purposes only. Any trades placed upon reliance of SharperTrades, LLC are taken at your own risk for your own account. Past performance is no guarantee. While there is great potential for reward trading stocks, cryptos, commodities, options, forex and other trading securities, there is also substantial risk of loss. All trading operations involve high risks of losing your entire investment. You must therefore decide your own suitability to trade. Trading results can never be guaranteed. SharperTrades, LLC is not registered as an investment adviser with any federal or state regulatory agency. This is not an offer to buy or sell stocks, cryptos, forex, futures, options, commodity interests or any other trading securities.


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